Review – LunarCafe.com

LunarCafe.com

Lunar Cafe

I do not generally review Internet sites, but LunarCafe.com was brought to my attention, and I felt that it presented its subject matter very well. The first thing that impressed me was the very clean look – white background, decent spacing, and good use of images. The header across the top of the landing page takes the reader to sections on Horoscopes, Astrology, Tarot, Numerology, Fun Games, and Learning. Also included on the landing page are links to Featured Contributor (I really felt that this was a nice touch, to allow site visitors to meet the person behind the words). Astrology (Moon Sign and Chinese Roster Sign – with built in software that allows the site visitor to edit in their birth date, so they can see what applies to them), and “Learn the Latest”, with a link at the bottom of the page that allows the site visitor to browse all of the articles.

 The right hand side of the site contains a form to fill out for site visitors to be added to the horoscope and mailing list, and a tasteful ad for a free psychic reading with Psychic Elements.

The Horoscope section includes daily, weekly, and monthly general horoscopes; daily, weekly, and monthly love horoscopes; and daily, weekly, and monthly career horoscopes; and a yearly horoscope. I found both the types of horoscopes offered, and the defined time periods to be quite attractive.

The Astrology section includes Zodiac Sign, Moon Sign, Chinese Zodiac Sign, and links to astrology related articles.

The section on Tarot includes a brief introduction to Tarot, with links to specific Tarot topics; Tarot card meanings, and links to Tarot related articles.

The section on Numerology includes Your Name & Numerology, and Your Life Path Number. There is software provided so that site visitors can input their personal information, and find out what their numbers are.

Under the “Fun Games” section we see “Are you a psychic?”, which is a game of prediction using the Zener cards, and  a free (automated) three card Tarot reading, using the Tarot of Marseille. I enjoyed playing in both of these sections, and loved the music that played while doing the Tarot reading!

Under the “Learn” section the site visitor will find Articles that can be accessed by category (Astrology, Horoscope,Tarot).  The Astrology category holds the most articles, with the Horoscope and Tarot sections still in the beginning stages.

I really liked this site … it was clear, concise, and easy to navigate. I could look for a specific piece of information, or I could go to the game section and amuse myself for as long as I wanted to. Well worth checking out!

(c) 2000 – 2014 Bonnie Cehovet

Reproduction prohibited without written permission from the author.

(cc

Review – “Whispers I Know”

Whispers I Know

Author: Noreen Jameson
2012
ISBN #978-1-105-60932-9

In the name of the Highest Being …
without beginning, without end …
the Eternal Being …
(from the introduction)

Noreen begins this book, her third (the first two being “Petals of the R.O.S.E.” and “Wells of Wisdom”), with the notation that she prefers to speak of her spiritual work as intuitive in nature, as opposed to being psychic. I agree with her, for the very reasons that she gives – that the word psychic is often regarded as being somehow in the realm of charlatans and fakirs. She then goes on to describe the different ways of sensing – clairvoyant (clear seeing), clairsentient (clear feeling), clairaudient (clear hearing), and clairalience (clear smelling), and claircognizant (clear knowing).

As a claircognizant, she knows things without ever having studied them, and without having any knowledge of the person or situation that she is receiving information about. This book is a continuation of her first two books … presenting information that has come to her in many different ways. (It might behoove me to note her that Noreen is a gifted metaphysician, healer, intuitive, and empath, who works closely with her guides and angels.)

One of the first things that Noreen talks about is finding our own spiritual essence, and that in doing so we will need to discard layers of negative/false conditioning. (Note: This is my perspective. We grow up with certain religious, cultural, and familial strictures/guidelines. As we go out into the world, we experience new things, and truly see what works for us. We keep what works for us, and discard the rest. Easier than it sounds, as family, friends, and the culture around us all push their own expectations on us.)

We are also encouraged to let our inner child out to play (not such an easy thing for an earth centered Cappie like me to do!). Easier for me is the encouragement to practice meditation, prayer, or simply take a “time out” on a regular basis. Be present, and live in the moment. Noreen touches on self-acceptance, and allowing ourselves to experience our emotions without repressing them, or judging them.

I loved the part about the life changes that we will experience when we live our spiritual essence. Amongst other things, we will feel lighter, worry less, experience less stress, and manifest more of what we want with less difficulty.

Each of the “clair” abilities is defined, along with how we process the information. Knowing that we have these abilities is really of no use until we develop them. The information in this book allows the reader to understand the process, which in essence takes the fear out of it. Then it goes one step further – with suggestions on how to develop each ability/ For this alone this book is worth a read!

The section on chakras is another of my favorites. The chakra system is how we process energy throughout our body. The seven major chakras are aligned on our spinal column (with the sixth chakra on our forehead, and the seventh chakra at the top of our head), and move energy up and down our spine. A blockage in one chakra not only presents problems with that particular chakra, but has the ability to affect all of the other chakras. I found the explanations of the chakras, how to tell if they were blocked, how to unblock them, and the questions that we need to ask ourselves, quite pertinent (as well as easy to understand).

A true gift is the section on grounding. It is so easy in this very fast paced world of our to become ungrounded. Too much information flying at us way too fast – instant overwhelm! To remain in the present, living from our center, we need to make the effort to remain grounded. Noreen presents information on Be-Ing Simple (a light meditation on the breath), and combining music with prayer/meditation.

There is also a section on crystals/gemstones and their color and energy associations. (The energy associations are specifically for abundance/ prosperity, safety/protection, dreamtime, healing/health issues, relationships, love relationships, and creativity.) Those who want to work with crystal grids will find information on that here too. For anyone who wants to do work on themselves, this will be pertinent information.

There is so much in this book that the reader can put to use in their life – including writing abundance checks (new moon schedules are provided for 2012 through 2015, as this is done within 24 hours after a new moon) and working with play money.

Noreen presents the Celtic Tree of Life as a subtle form of energy healing, on all levels. It is something that we can do on ourselves, as well as on others. Working with this system has many benefits, including clearing negative emotional patterns, connecting with Higher Self and Spirit, processing and releasing blocks, restoring balance, increasing awareness and clarity, and opening to vitality and wellness.

For those that work with Angels, Guides, and Archetypal energy, there is information on that here too! There is a nice explanation of what these energies are, and how to work with them. This is followed by a section on the construction and use of prayer beads. (I had never stopped to think that the prayer beads we place on our alter can be made of more delicate materials that prayer beads that we intend to carry with us!) If you want to construct your own prayer beads, this is a great section for you!

Noreen addresses Life Path Numbers as a tool for assessing our own spiritual essence. This section will lead many readers to a better understanding of themselves, and those around them. It is a tool that can be combined with other tools, such as Tarot, Angel work, and working with our Guides.

Another wonderful tool for understanding ones self and others is the Runes. They are presented here with great clarity … readers will find them very easy to work with. (This reminds me that I need to locate my set of Rose Quartz Runes – one that was specially made for me by a dear friend who has since passed on.)

Pendulum work is also discussed. A template is presented for asking questions of the pendulum which I find very interesting. I generally work within a directional Yes/No manner, so this is something new to me.

At the end of the book is an index that lists Tarot correspondences – what quality/energy is associated with which cards. This is a great help in learning the Tarot, or in expanding your knowledge of the Tarot.

There is a great deal of wisdom to be found within these pages (Note: I am reviewing the PDF format of this book). It is a wonderful read, and a great resource to have for personal work. Two thumbs up!

© July 2012 Bonnie Cehovet

Tarot Birth Cards – Sun/Wheel of Fortune/Magician

Over the next year I am going to be blogging about Tarot Birth Cards, what they mean and how we can work with them. I use the system of Tarot Birth Cards developed by Ruth Ann and Wald Amberstone of the Tarot School (www.tarotschool.com). Using the Seeker’s birth data (month, day and year), pairs of birth cards are defined. (For more information, and to calculate your own Birth Cards, go to http://tarotschool.com/Calculator.html.)

Please note: Karyn Easton and I have a project being published by Schiffer Books in fall of 2011 – my book, “Keys To Empowerment”, and Karyn’s deck, the “Tarot Lovers Tarot”. Karyn has a Birth Card calculator up on her site, where you can also view her incredible deck (it really is!) – http://paranormality.com/tarot-birth-card-calculator.shtml.

A special thanks to Leisa ReFalo, www.tarotconnection.netwho developed the Birth Card Calculator, and graciously gave us permission to use it.

Note: As of January, 2011, this has been broken down into two separate projects, but I will still be using the images from the “Tarot Lovers Tarot” in my book.

Our tenth pair of Birth Cards are the Sun (Key 19), the Wheel of Fortune (Key 10) and the Magician (Key 1). Some of the associations for these cards are:

Sun: 

Astrological Sign: Sun

Keywords: warmth, clarity, enlightenment, self-confidence, overcoming obstacles, the ability to draw  things to you, the ability to visualize clearly, being recognized for one’s abilities, opening up to creativity, joy, happiness, optimism, inability to be happy, inability to express joy, inability/refusal to see the good around you, either showing off or hiding your abilities, accepting credit for something that you have not done, false hope

Wheel of Fortune

Astrological Sign: Jupiter
Keywords: Destiny, karma, a fortunate turn of events, natural consequences, progress, adapting to change, beginnings and endings, seasons, cycles, resistance to change, a negative turn of events.

Magician


Astrological Sign: Mercury
Keywords: Power, new project, new phase of life, new beginning, skill, confidence, self-reliance, intelligence, control over resources, energy disrupted, lack of will, lack of focus, delusions of grandeur, unreliability, trickery, indecision, poor self-image.

The theme for this lifetime is dealing with the concept of time in all of its forms, and the change that comes with it. The Sun gives us clarity where there was darkness. The Wheel of Fortune works in cycles, with past, present and future intertwined. The Magician creates time, and has  the ability to suspend it.

We can choose to do personal work with our own Birth Cards, we can use Birth Cards in conjunction with a reading for a client (place their birth cards, drawn from a deck other than the one you are reading with, above the spread(s) laid out for them). The spread(s) are then read through the lens of perception of the Seeker’s Birth Cards. As added value, a reader could give their client scans of their Birth Cards, along with a short write-up about them. Readers can also use the Birth Card system to better understand other people in their own lives (family, co-workers, friends etc.).

The key to bringing balance to any lifetime is that of understanding how and where your Birth Cards are operating in your life.The Sun is ruled by the Sun, placing the focus on light, warmth, and enlightenment. Freedom to do as one pleases, happiness, contentment – the Sun brings all of these things to us. Here the individual lives in tune with nature, lives intuitively, in sync with the cycles of life. Everything about the Sun is seen int he light of day – nothing is hidden.

The Wheel of Fortune is ruled by Jupiter, with its authoritative, expansive nature. It is all about the cycles of life, death and rebirth, cause and effect, destiny and fate. Represented here is spiritual evolution. Is the Seeker able to detach from the people and things of their life and move on? Where and how are they needing to do so? What have they initiated in their lives that they are waiting for others to react to or build on? Remember – what was begun on the Magician’s path comes full circle here.

The Magician is rued by Mercury, placing the focus on defining goals, concentration on will and intent, and manifestation. He holds the keys to creation – he brings the energy of Spirit down into the earthly plane. His caveat – As Above, So Below. He represents the power of creation, and the ability to manifest. He balances his elemental tools to produce the vision that he sees in his mind. The Seeker here shows discernment, the ability to tell reality from illusion. They also have the ability to analyze and problem solve. The Seeker needs to ask themselves how they view the person or issue they are faced with, and what they want to do about them.

The Sun, the Wheel of Fortune, and the Magician set the tone for this lifetime. The path that the individual walks is one that addresses how time functions in their life, and how they adapt to the changes that time brings with it. The Sun asks us to open our hearts to enlightenment, to flow with life, to enjoy our abundance, and to honor it. The Wheel of Fortune asks us to pay attention in the present, to be aware of the opportunities being presented to us, and to acknowledge that which is not working, and needs to be released. The Magician asks us to acknowledge and make use of our personal power.

Images from the “Tarot Lovers Tarot”, Karyn Easton, 2008, paranormality.com

© January 2012 Bonnie Cehovet

Tarot Birth Cards – World/Empress


Over the next year I am going to be writing about Tarot Birth Cards, what they mean and how we can work with them. I use the system of Tarot Birth Cards developed by Ruth Ann and Wald Amberstone of the Tarot School (www.tarotschool.com). Using the Seeker’s birth data (month, day and year), pairs of birth cards are defined. (For more information, and to calculate your own Birth Cards, go to http://tarotschool.com/Calculator.html.)

Please note: I have a book being published by Schiffer Books in fall of 2011 – “Tarot, Birth Cards and You: Keys To Empowerment” (http://www.schifferbooks.com/newschiffer/book_template.php?isbn=9780764339028), incorporating images from Karyn Easton’s “Tarot Lovers Tarot”. This was to have been a joint project (book and deck published together), but the decision was made to publish both separately, which I find very exciting! Karyn has a Birth Card calculator up on her site, where you can also view her incredible deck (it really is!) –http://paranormality.com/tarot-birth-card-calculator.shtml.

A special thanks to Leisa ReFalo http://www.tarotconnection.net, who developed the Birth Card Calculator, and graciously gave us permission to use it.

Our twelfth pair of Birth Cards are the World (Key 21) and the Empress (Key 3). Some of the associations for these cards are:

The World:

Astrological Sign: Saturn
Keywords: allowing your limitations to act as a guideline to freeing your thinking and actions, manifesting that which you wish to see in your life, taking responsibility for your thoughts, words, and actions, finding the joy in  your life, fulfilling your own potential, fear of change, fear of success, holding on to the past, inability to manifest that which you  wish in your life, success delayed, inability to see the whole picture, living through one’s prior successes

The Empress:

Astrological Sign: Venus
Keywords: nurturing, mothering, mother image, creativity, fertility, physical birth, birth of new ideas, awareness of self, harmony in life, prosperity and abundance, undisciplined mothering, absence of a mother, fear of becoming a mother, fear of birthing new ideas, rejection of traditional female roles, feeling unempowered.

The theme for this lifetime is completing one’s inner work, bringing together the diverse parts of one’s life, the ability to feel comfortable in the external, physical world because the individual is at one with themselves. The ability to give and receive love, and to live from a sense of love.

We can choose to do personal work with our own Birth Cards, we can use Birth Cards in conjunction with a reading for a client (place their birth cards, drawn from a deck other than the one you are reading with, above the spread(s) laid out for them). The spread(s) are then read through the lens of perception of the Seeker’s Birth Cards. As added value, a reader could give their client scans of their Birth Cards, along with a short write-up about them. Readers can also use the Birth Card system to better understand other people in their own lives (family, co-workers, friends etc.).

The key to bringing balance to any lifetime is that of understanding how and where your Birth Cards are operating in your life. The World and the Empress represent the two aspects of the gateway into a 21/3 lifetime. The World is ruled by Saturn, placing the focus on on staying present and doing the work that needs to be done..

The Empress is ruled by Venus, placing the focus on love and compassion. Here we see the nurturing aspect of the feminine principle, and the need for peaceful, harmonious surroundings.

The World and the Empress set the tone for this lifetime. The path that the individual walks is one that addresses the completion of their path, the integration of opposites in their life, and the ability to give and receive love. The World reflects the power of self-actualization, of becoming a whole individual. Once we have integrated all of our selves, all of the opposites in our life, we have no mare need for masks. We can face the world, feel comfortable in it, and express our authentic selves. We do not attach ourselves to anyone or anything – we are whole as we are.

The Empress is all about learning to give and receive love, to become one with the feminine aspect within us. We are comfortable nurturing ourselves, as well as those around us. We honor and respect the harmony, abundance, and prosperity that surrounds us. There is a deep connection to our creative self.

A 21/3 (World/Empress) individual empowers themselves by

Images from the “Tarot Lovers Tarot”, Karyn Easton, 2008, paranormality.com .

© January 2012 Bonnie Cehovet

Tarot Birth Cards – Judgment/High Priestess


 

Over the next year I am going to be writing about Tarot Birth Cards, what they mean and how we can work with them. I use the system of Tarot Birth Cards developed by Ruth Ann and Wald Amberstone of the Tarot School (www.tarotschool.com). Using the Seeker’s birth data (month, day and year), pairs of birth cards are defined. (For more information, and to calculate your own Birth Cards, go to http://tarotschool.com/Calculator.html.)

Please note: I have a book being published by Schiffer Books in fall of 2011 – “Tarot, Birth Cards and You: Keys To Empowerment” (http://www.schifferbooks.com/newschiffer/book_template.php?isbn=9780764339028), incorporating images from Karyn Easton’s “Tarot Lovers Tarot”. This was to have been a joint project (book and deck published together), but the decision was made to publish both separately, which I find very exciting! Karyn has a Birth Card calculator up on her site, where you can also view her incredible deck (it really is!) –http://paranormality.com/tarot-birth-card-calculator.shtml.

A special thanks to Leisa ReFalo http://www.tarotconnection.net, who developed the Birth Card Calculator, and graciously gave us permission to use it.

Our eleventh pair of Birth Cards are the Judgment (Key 20) and the High Priestess (Key 2). Some of the associations for these cards are:

Judgment:

Astrological Sign: Pluto
Keywords: new perceptions, being reborn, renewed sense of purpose, coming to terms with your own actions, atonement, bringing together diverse partsof your personality, resisting change/transformation, running from one’s issues, feeling boxed in, lack of perspective, being overly critical.

The High Priestess:

Astrological Sign: The Moon
Keywords: inner wisdom, connection with intuition, women’s mysteries, seclusion, hidden information, dreamtime, anima (female part of personality), inability to connect with intuition, inability to access dreamtime, becoming either too social or too isolated, insincerity

The theme for this lifetime is the ability to observe, to the point of making good judgments in an objective manner. The ability to access one’s intuition, to communicate, and to accept new ideas.

We can choose to do personal work with our own Birth Cards, we can use Birth Cards in conjunction with a reading for a client (place their birth cards, drawn from a deck other than the one you are reading with, above the spread(s) laid out for them). The spread(s) are then read through the lens of perception of the Seeker’s Birth Cards. As added value, a reader could give their client scans of their Birth Cards, along with a short write-up about them. Readers can also use the Birth Card system to better understand other people in their own lives (family, co-workers, friends etc.).

The key to bringing balance to any lifetime is that of understanding how and where your Birth Cards are operating in your life. Judgment and the High Priestess represent the two aspects of the gateway into a 20/2 lifetime. Judgment is ruled by Pluto, placing the focus on personal will and determination, and on tearing down and rebuilding.The individual learns to make objective observations and then place this information to work in their life.

The High Priestess is ruled by the Moon, placing the focus on intuition and self-trust. She has balanced energies, with a strong connection to dreamtime, the unconscious, intuition and the feminine mysteries.

Judgment and the High Priestess set the tone for this lifetime. The path that the individual walks is one that addresses their ability to be objective in their observations about themselves, and the people and issues surrounding them. Judgment is all about releasing our limitations. How we think and act, about ourselves and others, sets the tone for a heaven or hell type of lifetime. Once we release thelimitations from our past, we experience a spiritual awakening.

The High Priestess is all about hidden wisdom, the feminine mysteries, dreamtime, and our intuitive selves. Because the High Priestess has the ability to work with her unconscious mind, she has a strong connection to her psychic, as well as her intuitive, ability. Her wisdom comes from expereince over many lifetimes. The High Priestess connects us with the realm of Spirit.

A 20/2 (Judgment/High Priestess) individual empowers themselves by releasing the past, and tuning in to dreamtime, and their own psychic/intuitive abilities.

Images from the “Tarot Lovers Tarot”, Karyn Easton, 2008, paranormality.com.

© January 2012 Bonnie Cehovet

Tarot Lovers Diary 2012

Tarot Lovers Diary 2012

Author: Karyn Easton
Artist: Karyn Easton
Paranormality.com

I was so happy when I learned that the “Tarot Lovers Diary” was going to be published for the year 2012! I have not only reviewed this diary over previous years, but it is one that I use on a daily basis. It sits right on my desk, and I list all of the things that I need to do each day. Yes, I use the Google calendar also, but the little diary calendar is a comfort zone for me.

The diary is A6, wire bound, with a sturdy plastic cover. (I like the wire bound feature because it is easy to flip the pages over. ) Included in the diary are a daily calendar, Tarot spreads, Tarot card meanings, Illustrations, Astronomical, and Calendarial information. (Note: The calendarial information is for the UK.)

Each week is listed with Monday through Thursday on the left hand page, and Friday through Sunday on the right hand page. Each day is broken in half, with the left hand side for am, and the darker right hand side for pm. At the bottom of each day is an event from history specific for that day. At the bottom of the right hand page on the left hand side is room to list notes and weekly priorities, with a full calendar for the month on the right hand side.

The diary begins with the Astronomical information, including the change in time for the summer in the UK, eclipses (with dates and explanations), and the listing of the seasons. This is followed by calendar information, which includes religious holidays, civil holidays for the UK, and a listing for all four phases of the moon.

There is a unique section in the diary authored by Marcus Katz, where he answers the top twelve Tarot questions, including: What is the right way to shuffle a Tarot deck?, How do you decide which spread to use?, and What is the best way to learn all the cards and symbols?

Several Tarot spread are offered: a seven card Question and Answer spread, a seven card Yes/No Answer spread, a three card Past/Present/Future spread, a Seven Card Infinity spread, a Six Card spread that acts as an overview for the areas of You, Travel, Relationships, Health, Finances, and Career, and a second seven card Question and Answer spread (in a different template).

The Tarot Lovers Card Meanings section presents all 78 cards with a small color scan, the card name and Qabalistic association, the Card Number, Key Number, Rulership, Hebrew Letter, Translation, Numerological Value, Astrological Association, Candle, Crystal, Upright and Ill Dignified Guideline Divinatory Meanings, and space at the bottom of the page to make personal notes.

The final section in the diary presents color scans of each of the 78 cards from the Tarot Lovers Tarot (artist/author Karyn Easton). Each image has the card back image on the back side, so that the images can be cut out and used as a mini-deck.

Throughout the diary Karyn has included full color reference to products on her http://www.paranormality.com site, including the Paranormality Tarot Card Meanings Sheet, her section on Tarot Birth cards (including a Birth Card calculator), her new Tarot Lovers Blog, the new Tarot Lovers Tarot card reader (an online reading application), the Paranormality Chinese Astrology Reference Sheet, the new Tarot Lovers Notebook, as well as information on her new Tarot Lover’s website.

Note: With a nod to transparency, I do need to let my readers know that Karyn has also included mention of my book, “Tarot, Birth Cards, and You” in the Tarot Lovers Diary 2012. My book would not have been possible without her, as the card images are from her Tarot Lovers Tarot deck. The very special news is that the Tarot Lovers Tarot is being published through Schiffer Books! I don’t know any of the publication information yet, but I am very happy that the deck will be available!

I use this diary in a very real way on a daily basis. I think that others will find it to be a useful diary for them also. High quality, full color – it doesn’t get better than this!

© January 2012 Bonnie Cehovet

Tarot For Magical Times

Tarot For Magical Times

Author: Rachel Pollack, Johannes Fiebig
U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
2011
ISBN #978-1-57281-720-3

I can never say enough about Rachel Pollack’s work, and this book, co-authored by Johannes Fiebig, with a contributing article by Ernest Ott, is no exception. Reflected is a world of magical practices and interpretations for each of the 78 cards of the Tarot, coming from the perspective of two of the finest minds in the Tarot world.

In their forward the authors address the fact that these are changing times. They talk about the years 2008-2024 as representing a “phase” in which we find the planet Pluto in the sign of Capricorn. They note that the last phases that saw Pluto in Capricorn were the era of the Reformation (1516-1532), and the era of Enlightenment (1761-1778). The common thread here being that Pluto in Capricorn places focus on the basic tenets of both the individual and their culture being subjected to a process of change.

The Tarot is offered as a tool of change, and it is offered in a very unique manner. The first three chapters of this book serve as a kind of triptych, with each of the three authors (Pollack, Fiebig, and Ott) presenting their approaches on how the Tarot can best help us in these times. All three chapters are incredibly well written.

Pollack’s chapter, entitled “It is the Moment, Not the Date”, works with the concept of the Tarot as representing the larger picture of the world falling apart, and then coming back together in such a manner that the past is able to be released, and a new world ushered in. I have always liked the manner in which Pollack presents the Major Arcana in the “3X7” theory, with the Fool above the cards, and three lines of seven cards each beneath him. In this book, she presents other ways of looking at this progression: (1) in two lines of 11 cards each, with the first line as 0-10, and the second line being 11-21, (2) with the Fool as the journeyer, and standing above the other cards, and the World as the destination, and standing below the cards. Between them are two lines of ten cards each (1-10 and 11-20). The Minor Arcana are denoted in an interesting manner: Wands – the way of struggle, Cups – the way of the heart, Swords – the way of Sorrow, and Pentacles – the way of the earth. The Court cards are seen as forming their own group, representing people, as opposed to actions or events.

Fiebig’s chapter, entitled “Riding the Storm”, focuses on the cultural revolution, around the time period of 1968. He sees the hippie movement of the 1960’s, and the feminist movement of the 1970’s as the “chief agents” behind the mass circulation of the Tarot. He notes that as with all symbolic languages and oracles, the Tarot is of special help when we have reached a dead end using other means. He also notes that all three contributors to this book, without consulting each other, gave the Tower central importance. Not surprising, since this is a book about change. As Pollack did in her chapter, Fiebig bases much of his commentary on the events of 9/11, and different people’s reactions to it. He talks about the archetypes as representing patterns of behavior of the soul, and the “Twin Towers” in Manhattan being destroyed because of their symbolic importance. “Whoever dares an own design for a living becomes a “Rider on the storm”.”

Ott’s chapter, entitled “New Life Blossoms In The Ruins”, focuses on the astrological significance of Pluto in Capricorn. (Note: Ott is Head of the School of Astrology in Karlsruhe, Germany, and founder of the German Tarot Association.) He talks about the three phases of moving from the old world structure to the new world structure: (1) Destruction of Walls, (2) New Life blossoms in the ruins,and (3) Resurrection of all that is buried. He notes that Pluto in Capricorn aids a resurrection of the shadow in the horoscope, and tearing down the walls of fear.

There is a short section by Pollack on spreads, presenting ways of looking at one, two and three card spreads. Fiebig has added an excellent section on paying attention to the positive and the negative of the cards – IOW, reading with 360 degrees of meaning.

Each card is presented with a small, full color image from the Rider/Waite/Smith deck, a short description of the card, the divinatory meaning, reversed meaning, and an action that can be taken based on the energy of the card.

The final section in the book talks about the qualities of time – the decans of the twelve months, and the cards assigned to them. For example: the Aries month is entitled “Turning a Desert into a Garden”, presents the basic quality for the sign of Aries (21 March – 20 April), discuses the Emperor, Tower, and Queen of Wands, as well as the three decans (1st decan – Two of Wands, 2nd decan Three of Wands, and 3rd decan Four of Wands). Note: Each decan has a short discussion, as well as words of advice. For the 3rd decan of Aries, the Four of Wands, the advice is: “Don’t accept any rotten compromise. Avoid nitpicking solutions. Do not hide your true reasons and your authentic feelings. They offer the best motivation and guarantee beautiful results!”

We are in transformational times – the authors take this one step further and present the Tarot as being a prophecy for this transformational change, and a guide to a rebirth into a new world – both on the individual and the community/world level. Through the use of full color images and astutely written texts, the authors offer us a new way of thinking and a new way of being. For me, the presentation in this book was a magical as the concepts. And it doesn’t end there – the book will be coming out simultaneously in English and German versions!

Needless to say, I highly recommend this book as a quality addition to any Tarot library, and a wonderful resource.

© December 2011 Bonnie Cehovet

The Easiest Way to Learn the Tarot – EVER!!

The Easiest Way to

Learn the Tarot – EVER!!

Author: Dusty White

Edited by: Brenda Judy

Booksurge Publishing

2009

ISBN #978-141969288-8

This is, at heart, a 324 page workbook for learning the Tarot. (And yes, I do differentiate between a workbook and a book that aims to present material in a more textual manner.) I have several quibbles with the presentation of this book, beginning with the use of clip art on the front and back pages. This might be fine in some instances, but the manner it is used in here makes me think that the author takes a very cavalier attitude toward Tarot, and towards teaching the Tarot. There is an online site that acts to give 24/7 assistance in any problems that a student may have through the use of its forums. The site provides information on the book itself, a Tarot community with help, instruction, news, forums, and guest lectures by Tarot experts. The aim is to provide a system of education that combines self-teaching, individual tutoring, and community support. This is a very nice concept, and it may work well (I don’t know, because I did not choose to join the site), but there is extensive use of clip art, which really turns me off.

There is a front-sheet for the reader/student to place their name, the date that they started working with the book, and the name of their instructor. This is a good thought, IMHO, because it creates a connection between the reader/student and the work they are doing.

In his introduction, White states that he feels the images in the Tarot come from a time that is long since past in societal evolution, that they reflect political structures that are different from those of modern times. He then goes on to say that the Tarot is still a highly useful “study guide” for personal advancement along metaphysical lines, and a “nifty” tool for predicting future events. The core of this book is in answering the following questions about the Tarot: “What does it mean?”, and “How Does It Work?”

The Major and Minor arcana are referred to as the two “camps”, with the Major Arcana being the “spooky cards”, and the Minor Arcana looking suspiciously like a “normal” deck of playing cards, with an added face card. The exercises in this book are meant to help the reader/student understand the Tarot, and create a good working relationship with their chosen deck. The reader/student is advised to leave the “esoteric stuff” alone until they have developed a thorough understanding of their cards.

In “Section One – Getting Started”, the necessary tools are listed: this book, a deck of Tarot cards, and a notepad or journal. The decks that are recommended are any of the “Waite” decks by U.S. Games. Yes, this is my second quibble with this book. To recommend a deck for a beginner to use is one thing, to recommend a publisher is an entirely different matter. I highly respect U.S. Games, and the line of decks that they offer, but other publishing houses also offer Waite or Waite “clone” decks. The “Halloween Tarot” somehow also made it onto the recommended list, while the Marseilles decks are pushed aside as leaving a lot to be desired – they are “nice to show off at parties”, but a quick “down and dirty” reading is better done, in the author’s opinion, with a Waite deck.

The first table that is presented is actually one that I feel is a good foundation for doing readings, as it lists the four suits, with their corresponding direction, season, and element. The Minor arcana are defined as “making sense”, and providing the details needed for interpretation. The Major arcana are defined as a set of symbols of elements of existence or society, with the notation that they contain psychological correspondences. White notes that the Major arcana are too “vague” for daily use without the help of the Minor arcana to clarify them.

As a workbook, the material is structured for use in 30, 60, and 90 day increments. It is suggested for the first 30 days that the book be read in its entirety, and that the exercises be done in order of presentation. Once the reader/student is comfortable with each exercise, they are encouraged to work with simple spreads as often as possible.

Section Two includes a 30 Day Checklist noting each exercise and the skill level of the reader/student, a chart with room to list what the reader/student learned on each day. The first exercises offered have to do with getting to know the cards, both at “face value”, and “beyond face value”, which moves into the imagery on the cards. Another quibble here – the black and white scans used to illustrate the exercises are placed at artsy angles, which does nothing but irritate me. (Note: The deck used for illustrations is the Waite Tarot – what I would normally refer to as the Rider-Waite Tarot.) Exercises two through four are basically two card comparisons, with exercises five and six working with three cards. Exercise seven works with opening up a card, while exercise eight blending the meanings for two cards into a central meaning. Exercise nine talks about blending the meanings for multiple cards into a central meaning, with exercise ten turning multiple cards into a story. Exercise eleven, which is optional, has the reader/student taping an older deck to the wall (on the order of a multiplication table). The extra-credit exercises are actually interesting – they are two and three card practice spreads with a list of questions to be answered. There is a list of “really advanced exercises” that have to do with moving the cards around, which I really did think was fun and educational. The reader/student is requested at the beginning of Section Two to “toss aside” the Major arcana until a later time.

Section Three discusses one through three and multiple card spreads (including the Celtic Cross, Astrological and timing spreads). In “fun things to do with your Tarot deck”, White talks about putting captions on the cards. Does this open up how the reader/student views the card? Yes, it does. It’s also fun. As a writer I choose to do this through story, though, rather than putting captions on my cards.

Section Three also includes sample “cheat sheets” for the Minor arcana Pips (numbered cards) and Court cards, and the Major arcana. For the Minor arcana, there is space for keywords/concepts. The Major arcana is set up to include interpretation, reversed interpretation, and notes.

Section Four introduces the Minor arcana. Each card (Pip and Court) includes Name, Astrological Orientation (Cardinal/Fixed/Mutable), description, prime elements (number, suit, direction, element), traditional meaning, and traditional reversed meaning. There is room for notes from the reader/student, and questions for the reader/student to answer.

Section Five introduces the Major arcana. Each card includes title, description, esoteric interpretation, traditional meaning, traditional reversed meaning, and a list of questions for the reader/student to answer.

Section Six includes instructions for the first 30 days of working with this workbook, as well as instruction to visit www.AdvancedTarotSecrets.com for help and further information.

Appendix A deals with troubleshooting basic problems, Appendix B is a Tarot FAQ (listing of Frequently Asked Questions), Appendix C is a brief history of the Tarot, Appendix D talks about how to be a hit at parties, Appendix E talks about party games, Appendix F Secret Societies and Mystery Schools that the reader/student may wish to join, while Appendix G is a recommended reading list. At the very end of the book is a glossary.

This workbook presents a good system for getting to know the Tarot, and for reading with it. The buyer beware caveat here is that the author’s style is very breezy, which will not appeal to all people. I was interested to see that there was an associated site, which is there to support the book, but I don’t know how well the site functions, as I did not join it. This is definitely a workbook where I would say “Take what you will, and leave the rest behind.”

© December 2011 Bonnie Cehovet