From My Bookshelf: Courts and Courtly Arts in Renaissance Italy

Intriguing info on the Italian courts and society!

Tarot Heritage

If you want to immerse yourself in the world that gave us the Visconti-Sforza and Sola Busca decks, this book, subtitled Arts, Culture and Politics 1395 to 1530, will deliver.

Nothing was ever the same in Italian politics and society after Gian Galeazzo Visconti purchased the title of Duke from the Holy Roman Emperor in 1395. Other rulers soon followed suit: the Gonzaga of Mantua, Montefeltro of Urbino, d’Este of Ferrara and the rulers of Savoy.

Unlike a French or German aristocrat who could trace his pedigree back to Charlemagne, a newly-minted Italian duke did not have a divine right to rule. These parvenus were acutely aware of their modest origins as merchants or condottieri who had usurped civic power. They felt tremendous pressure to over-compensate by amassing a trophy art collection and building ostentatious palaces that were stage settings for elaborate ceremonies and festivals.

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2 comments on “From My Bookshelf: Courts and Courtly Arts in Renaissance Italy

  1. Carissa says:

    Thanks for finally writing aabout >From My Bookshelf: Courts
    annd Courtly Arts in Renaissance Italy < Bonnie Cehovet <Liked it!

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