The Cartomancer December 2016 Issue

November 2016 issue of the Cartomancer!

Tarot Heritage

This magazine just keeps getting better. The latest issue has several articles that especially intrigued me.

In the Tarot Art section, Monica Bodirsky’s Lucky Lenormand deck caught my eye. Its swirling, free form watercolor background appeals to me since I adore abstract art. Bodirsky appears twice more. Bonnie Cehovet reviewed her deck, then Bodirsky contributed an article on cartomancy, the proliferation of Lenormand decks, and the role imagery plays in a reading.

View original post 255 more words

Besançon Decks

A new to me Tarot style – Besancon. Quite interesting!

Tarot Heritage

As far as I know, there are only a few Besançon-style decks on the market. I’ll start my survey with the most affordable and accessible deck, a re-creation by Evalyne Hall. While translating the writings of Antoine Court de Gebelin and the Comte de Mellet (18th century French authors who were the first to link Tarot and Kaballah), she realized de Mellet used a Besançon deck. Since she didn’t have access to this type of deck, she created her own by lovingly re-drawing historic cards that reside in Paris in the Bibliothèque Nationale.

View original post 338 more words

Oh No…Retrograde?!

From My Bookshelf: Courts and Courtly Arts in Renaissance Italy

Intriguing info on the Italian courts and society!

Tarot Heritage

If you want to immerse yourself in the world that gave us the Visconti-Sforza and Sola Busca decks, this book, subtitled Arts, Culture and Politics 1395 to 1530, will deliver.

Nothing was ever the same in Italian politics and society after Gian Galeazzo Visconti purchased the title of Duke from the Holy Roman Emperor in 1395. Other rulers soon followed suit: the Gonzaga of Mantua, Montefeltro of Urbino, d’Este of Ferrara and the rulers of Savoy.

Unlike a French or German aristocrat who could trace his pedigree back to Charlemagne, a newly-minted Italian duke did not have a divine right to rule. These parvenus were acutely aware of their modest origins as merchants or condottieri who had usurped civic power. They felt tremendous pressure to over-compensate by amassing a trophy art collection and building ostentatious palaces that were stage settings for elaborate ceremonies and festivals.

View original post 660 more words

Zoni Tarot de Marseille: Big and Small

Quite interesting commentary here! This really is a small deck! I would like to hear what the dots are all about too.

Tarot Heritage

I’ve just acquired the tiniest deck in my historical facsimile collection — a miniature version (1-1/8 x 2-¼ inches) of Il Meneghello’s reproduction of a TdM printed in Bologna in 1780 by Giacomo Zoni. Lo Scarabeo also publishes a facsimile. Shown above is a mini card superimposed on the Lo Scarabeo, which is a bit larger than Il Meneghello’s full-size version.

View original post 342 more words

Soprafino Death Card

I love the notes that fly into my life like this!

Tarot Heritage

When I saw this print on the Hyperallergic art blog, I immediately thought it must have been the inspiration for the Soprafino Death card (see below). The artist’s palette caught my eye first. Then I noticed so many other items the two images have in common: gold chains, a medallion, bishop’s hat, armor, a spear point and crown. I think I see the spine of a book near the far right edge of the print. The book isn’t nearly as prominent as on the card, but the stone tablet on the print sits in nearly the same location and tilted at the same angle as the Soprafino book.

View original post 188 more words

Review – The Fairy Tale Lenormand

Fairy Tale Lenormand

Author: Arwen Lynch
Artist: Lisa Hunt
U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
2016
ISBN #978-157281797-5

fairy-tale-lenormand

The Fairy Tale Lenormand” is a traditional 36 card deck, with two extra Lady and Gentleman cards (for personalized readings), bringing the deck to 38 cards. It comes in a beautiful metal tin, with a 120 page companion book. The theme for this deck is that of Fairy Tales – stories that we remember from our childhood, stories that entertain, while presenting us with life lessons. The world of fairy tales is a magical world, and there is no better artist than Lisa Hunt to bring this world alive for us.

img234

Donnaleigh de La Rose, in her foreword, talks about peering into our own life fairy tale. We know that we all have our own stories, but how many of us regard them as fairy tales! She talks about seeing mirror images of familiar childhood fairy tales in our own lives. Another point that de La Rose makes is that in creating a Lenormand deck, it was necessary for Hunt to simplify the imagery from her usual detailed style. To the point that de La Rose feels that in the Fairy Tale Lenormand  there is a perfect fusion between theme and functionality.

In her introduction, Lynch talks about fairy tales serving as teaching tales, and how in the Fairy Tale Lenormand these myths are woven into the Lenormand structure to help readers learn to associate the cards in a more meaningful way. Where meanings are more concrete than in the stories themselves. (In the Lenormand, as opposed to other divination systems, the card meaning holds fast – i.e. it is not open to interpretation by the reader).

img233

Each card is presented with the card title, playing card association, the associated fairy tale, and an explanation of how the tale fits into the card meaning. For example, card number 2 Clover carries the keywords luck, creativity, and serendipity, and is associated with the fairy tale “Thumbelina”. Card number 6 Clouds carries the keywords depression, confusion, and sadness, and is associated with the fairy tale “East o’ the Sun, West o’ the Moon”.

 Spreads presented include an explanation of fan-type spreads, the Crossroads Spread, the Tower Spread, and the Happily Ever After Spread.

 

 

img228

 

The cards are 2 ¼” by 3 ½”. The backs are done using a gold background, with a black scrolled border, and a black  central image. The cards are reversible. The card faces show a gold border around a central image. The card number is in the upper let hand corner, with the associated playing card number and suit in the lower right hand corner. The card title is centered on the bottom of the card.

The artwork is done largely in pastels, and has a fantasy, “otherworld” quality to it.

 

 

 

img230

 

The fairy tales presented are multi-cultural, which brings a certain depth to the deck. The artwork is fascinating – for me it brings back memories of these stories from my childhood. Time spent with this deck is well worthwhile! Each time you read a card, more symbols become evident – there are levels upon levels here!

© November 2016 Bonnie Cehovet
Publication prohibited without written permission from the author.